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stilllookin
Jun 26, 2004, 3:32 pm
Found a lot of these last year. Are they shaggy's?

stilllookin
Jun 26, 2004, 3:33 pm
Button

stilllookin
Jun 26, 2004, 3:33 pm
Cut stem

miker
Jun 26, 2004, 5:03 pm
SL, sporeprint it, should be white, was the stalk white prior to pulling it from the ground? miker

stilllookin
Jun 26, 2004, 6:15 pm
Last year when I printed it, it came out white. Don't remember if the stalk was white originally, but the books I have say the stalk will darken as it ages. The button stalk is white so I would bet that it was. The key feature the audobon says is the saffron color when cut. The green spore doesn't have this and the spores are light green. Just trying to get a positive id so when they come up I can get them before they go bad. Thanks.

miker
Jun 26, 2004, 7:06 pm
SL, not using a book at this time,but believe it to be the shaggy, don't chance it off of memory, the sporeprint will tell, the cut color is correct for the specie. miker

stilllookin
Jun 26, 2004, 7:09 pm
Thanks miker. Spore print was white last year for sure. In the green spore, what have you found the color to be? Very green or almost white where it would be hard to tell them apart? I can add this and the black trumpet to my list of edibles found!!!! Now if I could only find the king. Have any pointers for someone in your neck of the woods? Thanks again

miker
Jun 26, 2004, 7:13 pm
SL, don't rely off of a memory print, sporeprint the thing, all things match up. make positive I.D, miker

Happy Trails
Jun 26, 2004, 7:13 pm
stillookin,

I know the Audubon leads one to believe that the green spored lepiota doesn't turn a bright saffron when cut: DON"T BELIEVE THAT. Other field guides state they can turn a bright orangish color when cut and from personal experience I can tell you they do. This is one example of where it pays to study and refer to several field guides when attempting a ID. The gills of the green spored can be completely white when absolutely fresh, but the sporeprint will be a ghastly green. Actually, the gills of the example posted is coming across my monitor with a greenish cast. While I don't believe your example is a green spored, the simple test of a sporeprint is invaluable. According to David Arora, the green spored lepiota is responsible for more mushroom poisonings than any other one species. You most likely won't die, but you may wish you did.

Happy Trails

Happy Trails.

stilllookin
Jun 26, 2004, 7:18 pm
As long as the green spore is gastly green then, I had the shaggy. I thought it might have a very very light green tint to it, but when I took it into direct sunlight, I didn't see the green tint, just white. But as with nature I wouldn't rule out a light green print from the green spore. I will be sure to spore print them again when they come up this year. I checked 4 books and I saw that a couple mentioned the saffron in both and to rely only on the spore print. This is such a great site. I would never eat anything without you guys, even if I was 100% sure from the books. Thanks again.

Happy Trails
Jun 26, 2004, 7:22 pm
The ones I've found are a ghasty light olive green. Where did you find them? Oftentimes the green spored will be right out in the open on lawns and I've seen some beautiful large fairy rings.

Happy Trails

stilllookin
Jun 26, 2004, 7:26 pm
Found them like the books say mostly. Huge numbers under conifers uphill from a wetland. Loose rich soil. Found a couple of rings areund 2 conifers. There must have been 50-75 around each tree with a few other groups not in rings. Must have been at least a couple hundred. They were on the way out when I found them, and by the time I thought I had them figured out they were gone. Is the best way to preserve them drying?