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Old Mar 2, 2015, 6:46 am   #1
Frank
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Bone Stock and Consumme

I used to get free beef soup bones from a farmer up in Gaylord years ago. But I can't find any free bones yet down here, so I bought some for $1.99 lb. at two different stores.

1st store only had long femur bones that were frozen. They wouldn't cut the frozen bones smaller. Too hard on the band saw when frozen.
Hmmm.... why didn't they do it before freezing?
Maybe they were just meant for dog bones. You sure need a much larger pot than I was planning on using, for 4 or 5 of those bones. I bought some anyway.


I then stopped at 2nd store.
They were willing to cut the femurs to size I wanted at same price of $1.99 lb. They were also frozen. They didn't have any knuckle joints, so I won't get much collagen out of this batch, but the other nutrients will be in there. I had to use ALL my will power not to scoop out the marrow onto some toast and eat it, but I want everything leeched into the broth, so I managed to only de-marrow one bone after roasting for tasting purpose.

Due to the long bones I had to use much more liquid to cover, which means a weaker stock, or longer reducing time. 2nd store will be my goto place now for bones.
Shorter bones, less liquid needed to cover, = better stock.

Anyway, here they are roasted and just started in the pot. Will simmer for two or three days, before canning broth up. Broth will darken as it absorbs the roasted stuff. Plus tomorrow, or next day, I will roast the onions, garlic, carrots, celery and add to the pot. This will also darken the stock more. What else is there to do, while waiting for cold temps to break for spring, that is healthy, fun, and keeps the house warm,with some humidity in it. LOL
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And some Chicken back stock chillin' on back porch waiting for fat removal tomorrow. It cooked about a day and a half.
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When making bone broth, If you can, crack the bones.
Then add about a tablespoon or two, of apple cider vinegar to my bone broth. It helps with the leeching.

I use onion, carrots, celery, pepper corns and usually some garlic, in all my stock. You don't need too much. A couple of each veggie and a teaspoon of pepper corns, is fine. I don't salt it at beginning. I wait until it has reduce to my liking, and then salt to taste. You can always add salt when cooking, but you can't take it out.

For chicken stock, I add a little Tumeric near the end. Last hour or more of cooking. Add it to taste, rather than to color. Otherwise you may end end up too much Tumeric in broth.

For beef broth, I put my bones in big pan of cold water with a couple tablespoons of apple cider vinegar and soak for one hour. Rinse bones off and rub any crud from them right in the soaking pan. Pat dry with paper towels, and place on a disposable foil pan, and into a 375* F. oven for 30 minutes. Turn bones and roast for another 15 minutes. Brush on tomato paste on all the bones, and roast anther 15 minutes, turn and roast another 15 minutes. (For a darker stock broil for 5-7 minutes each side after roasting. Be careful though. It's easy to burn and ruin your stock. Browned taste good... burnt doesn't!

Add to large pot and just cover by an inch or two with cold water and two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar. Bring to gentle boil "slowly" and then reduce heat to only get a bubble 3 or 5 times a minute.
That's perfect! Just let it simmer for a day with tight lid on. No need to skim scum, because you got rid of most of all it, from the soaking & washing process.

2nd day roast veggies in pan at 375* until nicely browned. Add these with 3 or 4 Bay leaves to pot. Simmer another day.

If you're like me, and simmer beef bones for 3 days, then wait until at least 24-30 before end, to add veggies. If veggies are simmered too long with bones thy can sometimes add a bitter taste to broth.

Add herbs on last day of cooking too, for same reason.

Stay Warm, and enjoy a hot mug of broth, until Morel season gets here!
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Old Mar 3, 2015, 5:19 am   #2
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Re: Bone Stock

Day 2 with beef broth.
Added roasted veggie's, bay leaves and peppercorns to stock.
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Old Mar 5, 2015, 7:49 am   #3
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Re: Bone Stock

Day 3 - canning.
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24 pints, Fresh from Pressure cooker!

3 pints of chicken soup
8 pints of chicken stock
13 pints of beef stock (+ two pints in fridge to process later)

(3 pints of chicken soup, 4 pints of chicken stock, and 8 pints of the beef stock, will go up north to our friend undergoing a second back surgery in 10 days.) Debbie is up there now to help her, and take care of her horses.

I had to process 5 pints of stock with the 3 pints of soup for 75 minutes, because it had meat in the three pints.
Rest of the stock processed for 25 minutes.

I know, I know... 20 minutes for pints, and 25 for quarts for stock/broth.
What's 5 extra minutes gonna hurt? I just processed 5 pints of broth for 75 minutes, when in with the soup. LOL
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Old Mar 5, 2015, 8:03 am   #4
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Re: Bone Stock

Here is a warning for what to look out for with jar lids.

I bought 2 cases of pints with lids and rings. I've always just used the lids that came with them on. NOT ANYMORE!

1st box of jars gave me two "wrinkled" Lids. Don't know how else to describe it. I didn't notice it when canning, but did notice after canning.

Here is a pic on one of them.
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And the next case of jars had these bent edges, which I did notice before canning.

Bent edges on lids.
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So, my advice is to double check each lid you buy, and never use the ones that comes with the canning jars. Toss all of them and use new lids in a box.
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Old Mar 6, 2015, 11:37 am   #5
celticcurl
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Re: Bone Stock

I might try this. I make lots of stock and freeze it.

Good tip about the lids. It's got me wondering if that is why some of my jams didn't seal last year.
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Old Apr 20, 2015, 6:03 am   #6
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Chicken Consomme

My first chicken stock consomme attempt turned out, not too bad.


Making stock after first simmering legs and thighs with celery, onion & carrots, then removed meat from bones.
Added bones & skins back to it, along with a few more veggies and a little Turmeric. Cooked overnight, 12-18 hours.
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Next day I strained stock, and placed in fridge overnight. then removed all the fat I could get off after overnight in fridge.

Then I mixed julienned veggies (carrots, celery, onions) with ground, or chopped, chicken meat and beaten egg whites.
Use about 7 or 8 egg whites for 8-10 qt. of stock. About 1 egg white per quart. (If making a small amount I would use 2 egg whites per quart.)

I Placed beaten whites and veggie mix in fridge after mixing, to cool down more, for a couple of hours. Everything has to be cold to start.


Then mixed the raft stuff into cold stock straight from from fridge before adding any heat. I used big restaurant style whisk to mix. Never do that with ground meat! What a mess to clean! Use a fork to mix, and separate mixture well.

Just beginning the process.
Here the strained, chilled & fat removed, chicken stock, mixed up with the cold, with fine julienned mirepoix.
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I kept stirring on med high flame for about 30 minutes or so, until it started to reach a higher temp (about 125*),
Then I occasionally gently stirred every minute or so, for another 10 to 15 minutes, and let it come to a slow rolling simmer, then turned down heat to low simmer.



Raft just beginning to form. At this point I quit stirring.
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A few minutes later raft is complete.
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Then carefully moved to smallest burner, and let slow simmer, stock just barely moving.
Using a spoon I gently created hole to fit the size of ladle I would use later for removing clarified broth.
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Every one or two minutes, I used a ladle to remove some floating stuff from the hole and poured it over undisturbed raft.
I did this all the way through the 35 - 40 minutes it took after raft stage was complete, to where I thought it was done filtering.


Ladled through 6 layers of cheese cloth placed into simple colander. Didn't use coffee filters, or a chinois.


Here it is still warm before removing all fats from top. Not much fat left though.
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With a properly made consomme, they say you should be able to read the date on a dime at bottom of bowl.

I didn't want to drop a dime on my soup. (What did it ever do to me?) LOL
So I just placed a 40 year old spoon into it. You can see the results, and judge for yourself.
(If you enlarge by clicking on the photo, you'll notice that you can see the scratches and marks on the spoon underneath, so I guess you could probably read the date on a dime too.)

I'm pleased with it, and it was fun to do. If I hadn't used the skin, and added Turmeric, it would've been much a more clear stock.

I used this bowl shown above, to test, and it was awesome! Very chicken flavored. Much more than I expected. I thought it would be a weak chicken flavor, but it isn't. Cool!

I did noticed, and so did Debbie, even though I had not mentioned it to her,
that the texture/feel was very smooth. More so, than our regular stock.
Deb said it felt Silky, or Velvety to her when she tested it.

Consomme is more suited for higher end resturants, and seldom used at home, unless you entertain a lot, with fancy dishes on delicate china.

I bet my Mother-in-Law knew how to make this. Her dinners were always something special. Better than any 4 star resturant. That lady could COOK!

But for most of us country home folks, it's just a highly refined clear stock, to make pretty soups with. Now if you use milk, cream, rue's, and etc. to make dumplings or such things, you loose the look.

It will still taste good, AND it is still fun to do!

BTW... that spoon has been my designated ice cream spoon, for longer than I can remember for sure.
I said 40 years, but it's even be older than that. I can remember using it back in the mid 70's, after getting out of the army.

It's the only spoon I use for my ice cream.
Why? ... It smaller than most, and I don't suffer from Ice Cream Eye with it. LOL
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